Posts Tagged: Holly Acres Nursery

Container Tomatoes

11_augThrough the years I have grown accustomed to and actually prefer to grow plants in containers. Perhaps this habit evolved from my days as a child when I tried to futilely grow plants in the hard clay of my Wyoming home. I actually celebrated the day when I got dandelions to grow but that will be another story for another time.

Each morning I try to make the rounds around the garden perimeter to take a mental note of how things are growing or in some cases not growing. So far most everything seems to be doing well. There have been some challenges but I am blessed that I have had more successes than challenges. One such success appears to be this year’s attempt at growing tomatoes. Like most gardeners, the idea of growing fresh tomatoes is something I consider the pinnacle of the growing season. I remember my ex mother-in-law growing absolutely gorgeous tomatoes in her greenhouse. She would buy a bag of the best potting mix, plant her seeds and off they went like a wildfire. Based on this, I thought tomato growing must be the easiest thing a gardener can do! Experience has definitely brought forth a much different conclusion.

My first attempt at tomato growing was in Arizona. The trick to growing tomatoes in the low desert is to start them very early so they are done fruiting before the temperatures rise above 90 degrees. I had no luck with the larger tomatoes and limited success with cherry tomatoes. I do not think I was able to water them enough. Now that I am in Colorado, I do not have to worry about the heat but the watering is still an issue. If you water too much or too little, you can end up with a wide variety of issues and the most common issue I experience is end blossom rot. From what I have read, this is due to inconsistent watering which for me sounds spot on as I still have yet to strike a balance with the perfect watering regime for my tomatoes. As a result, last year I had no viable tomatoes but I vowed things would be different this year.

My beautiful, ripening tomatoes

My beautiful, ripening tomatoes

During a trip to Holly Acres I set out to purchase some cherry tomato plants but during that trip there was none available. Though tempted by the beautiful images on the tags of the larger tomato varieties, I thought I perhaps not and then I noticed that there was a sale going for container tomatoes. I had never heard of container tomatoes or shall I see tomato varieties specifically intended to be grown in a container. I use my Earth Boxes sure but as mentioned, last year when growing tomatoes in these boxes, I did not have any success. I asked about how reliable these tomatoes were and the entire staff swore by them. I thought I would give them a shot.

These plants were purchased early in the season and in they went into my empty Earth Boxes. Well, I am pleased to say that so far, they have been growing beautifully and each plant is full of fruit. Some of the tomatoes have already ripened and they were incredibly juicy and delicious so win/win! I was given some other varieties including a Roma tomato and end blossom rot has occurred again but not in any of the container tomatoes. Any day now I will be able to harvest several at once as they continue to ripen. What a blessing! So far, I am pleased to say I would completely recommend growing these tomatoes to every gardener. You can purchase seeds for next season here.

Beyond the tomatoes, most everything in the garden is at peak performance. I am having issues with my cone flowers and I believe that is due to over watering. I may need to move them or at least add some gravel or something so their feet are not constantly wet.

There is so much love a gardener provides to the world around them. I thank you all so much for reading and until next time, happy gardening and blessings to you all!

The beauty of the garden in July and August:

Sweet Peas

Sweet Peas

Thistle

Thistle

Yarrow beneath my large aspen

Yarrow beneath my large aspen

Sweet Peas

Sweet Peas

More Sweet Peas

More Sweet Peas

Petunia Hanging Basket

Petunia Hanging Basket

Marigold

Marigold

New Flower Bed

New Flower Bed

Desert Bluebells

Desert Bluebells

Cay Lily

Cay Lily

Day Lily

Day Lily

Closeup of Coneflower

Closeup of Coneflower

Butterfly Bush

Butterfly Bush

Blanket Flower

Blanket Flower

Blanket Flower Bud

Blanket Flower Bud

Sweet Cicely

18_Jun_201326 May 2013
06:35 a.m.

The title of this post immortalizes the feeling I had the day I planted four of these seeds. They were unusual looking seeds and I am looking forward to them sprouting.

Here is an excerpt from my written journal I created that day:

I sit now in relative peace and quiet and it is very relaxing. I was up with the sun and I feel blessed to have seen it rise. As I write these words I am reminded of Diane Lane in Under the Tuscan Sun as she writes a postcard for someone else. I am reciting what I write in my head just as she did in the movie.

There is a slight breeze which makes the aspen sing; this combined with the bird chatter creates a peaceful melody.

There should have been more to write in my journal that day but as it turns out, three hours later, I was rushed to the hospital due to a nosebleed that just would not stop. When all was said and done, the suspected cause was stage two hypertension and the severe nosebleed was a symptom to alert me to this. What an alert it was! After that, I could not do any work in the garden for over a week which was very frustrating considering all there is to do.

Mass of seedlings competing for space.

Mass of seedlings competing for space.

Fast forward three weeks and my blood pressure is more under control and it is business as usual in the garden and there is much to share. First, there are seedlings abound in the large pot where I planted the Kiss Me over the Garden Gate (Polygonum orientale). One item of note is I really should have taken the time to spread the seeds out more as there is a large mass of seedlings competing for space and I fear this may not work out too well. A few of the Polygonum seeds have sprouted but I am hoping there will be more. I may purchase some more seeds as I would love to have a grove of these growing along the entire fence. I paused from writing for a bit to order a few hundred seeds from Seed Savers Exchange. Though I of course do not need this many, this will ensure I am able to create that grove I want. From what I have read, there is a long germination time so I will be sure to soak the seeds first to speed up growing times.

Beyond the sprouts in this pot, there has been a prolific amount of growth everywhere in the garden and each day’s new discoveries are so humbling. There is a beautiful sort of magic that only tending a garden can provide and I am so blessed to have such a tremendous amount of beauty surrounding me.

Viola rescued from grass

Viola rescued from grass

Volunteer viola via plant purchase

Volunteer viola via plant purchase

When we first moved into this house, I noticed some viola tri-color volunteers emerging from the grass. At that time I employed a lawn mowing service and thankfully I noticed these volunteers before they came in with the machines and removed them. I rescued them and placed them in the half whisky barrel where eventually a group of day lilies went (note I need to get a few more clumps to create a mass planting). Within the last couple of days I noticed the small flowers of what is my favorite species of flower poking out which reaffirms my opinion of these being among the friendliest flowers. Speaking of volunteers, I intentionally purchased a plant from Holly Acres Nursery that had a viola tri-color contained within. At the moment, it is outperforming the original plant. I suppose that cannot be helped though considering it was a victim of the hail we had a couple weeks ago. Though not a devastating storm by any account, it did its fair deal of damage. My new Virginia Creeper was mangled and shredded along with scores of tree foliage, extensive damage to the bee balm and a fair amount of damage to other low growing plants including the Corsican violet. I am pleased to say that most everything is recovering nicely now and I have left a fair bit of the leaves etc. on the lawn in the hopes of providing organic material for it to possibly grow better.

transplanting_aspens.fw

Aspen stems with dead leaves

Aspen stems with dead leaves

My handyman came over to do a few jobs and considering he could dig a hole more efficiently and proficiently than I could, I asked him to create a nice size hole between the two apple trees. This hole would be the new home for some volunteer aspen saplings growing on the side of the house where the white dahlias and columbines grow. Removing them while trying to retain a decent root ball would be the primary challenge. Sadly, we broke several main roots in our quest and immediately I worried about the future health of these little trees. It did not help that we did this in the middle of the day and when we moved them their new location was saturated in strong sunlight. Immediately the leaves wilted which I expected but they never recovered and eventually turned black. I thought of removing them and put the whole exercise down to gardening experience but I saw some leaves on the smaller stems making a comeback. The main larger twigs of the trees are still bendy so there may be hope yet. I removed the black leaves and scattered them about the lawn as food for the worms. This is one project I would like to be successful. Stay tuned.

patience_rewarded.fw

Back in February I wrote an article about how I was waiting for some Impatien seeds to sprout within containers inside the house. Well, to date, none have but a few weeks ago I nonchalantly threw a few into the whisky barrel at the front of the house and today I am pleased to announce I have sprouts! As I added all the varieties I purchased from Plant World Seeds, I do not know which will come up but the fact that any are growing at all is very exciting. I will provide updates over the coming weeks.

Before closing, I wanted to journal some plants I purchased from Wilmore Nurseries over last weekend (15-16 June 2013). The main reason for going there was to replace a St. John’s Wort, Mother of Thyme and trumpet flower that did not break dormancy. While there, I purchased some new plants to help fill in some blank spots. Here is what I purchased:

Two Delphinium grandiflorum ‘Blue Butterfly’
Two Penstemon “Scarlet Bugler”
One Lemon Balm
One Mystery Grape Vine
Two ‘SunPatiens’ Compact Deep Rose (Note, I really should have looked at the labels of these plants. I do not like engineered plants really. Despite being for the sun, these were placed in the shade)

One more thing for the journal is to note that the Strike It Rich rose did not make it sadly. I was able to exchange it and I chose this as a replacement:

Olympiad Rose Bloom

Olympiad Rose Bloom

Olympiad Hybrid Tea

Description: Each large bright true-red bloom is held on long stout stems and holds their color to the very end. Distinctive grey-green foliage on a very vigorous upright plant.

Color: Bright true-red

Height/Habit: Medium-tall/Upright

Bloom/Size: Medium-large, double

Petal Count: 30 to 35

Fragrance: Light fruity

Parentage: Red Planet x Pharaoh

The world of gardening is probably best summed up as ordinary miracles happening every day. Being a gardener is a sheer joy and to make something out of a little bit of earth is a blessing. I hope you are having an amazing start to the growing season and until next time, Happy Gardening and Blessings to you all!

Grass gone to seed

Grass gone to seed

Delphinium

Delphinium

Cranesbill Geranium

Cranesbill Geranium

Morning Glory Seedlings

Morning Glory Seedlings

Snapdragon Bloom

Snapdragon Bloom

Hollyhock Seedling

Hollyhock Seedling

Mystery seedlings in pot

Mystery seedlings in pot

Artistic photo of Day Lily Leaf

Artistic photo of Day Lily Leaf

Purslane Growing

Purslane Growing

Container tomato flowers

Container tomato flowers

Red Yarrow

Red Yarrow

Artistic photo of white dutch clover bloom

Artistic photo of white dutch clover bloom

The Gift of Spring

22_May_2013Dear Friends,

It is amazing what can happen in just two and a half weeks! Spring has finally arrived and actually, the temperatures lately have been more summer than spring like. Like all things, this is only temporary though and cooler weather returns this week. With the warmer weather, I am pleased to share that everything seemed to make it through the record cold mentioned in the last post. All the new plants suffered a little bit but overall made it through unscathed. The rock jasmine’s canopy of miniature white flowers died off so I cut them back. Today, I noticed they are coming back in grand fashion. There was some burning on the bellis but through it all, the pink showy flowers are still pink and showy. All the buds formed on the aspens, elderberry, etc., made it through fine as well. There is so much new growth and new surprises every day. It truly is miraculous and so humbling.

In Flanders Fields the poppies blow

In Flanders Fields the poppies blow

With the rise in temperatures, I have been very busy improving soil, digging, planting plants and seeds and moving things around to conform to whatever my current mood ends up being. I want to make a point to keep a journal of everything I do outside so I can refer back to it in the future. This will be particularly useful when it comes to planting seeds. I tend to forget not only what I planted but also where and when. Hopefully I can be diligent enough to remember to write in the little notebook every time I am outside. Here are my notes thus far:

Friday, 3 May I planted several Flanders poppy seeds along with some marjoram near the mint julep. I also planted some carrot seeds in the green house.

Saturday, 4 May I planted some purslane. (UPDATE 13 May 2013) I can see the purslane seedlings emerge.

Kiss Me Over the Garden Gate from My Gardening Past

Kiss Me Over the Garden Gate from My Gardening Past

Saturday, 11 May

SEEDS

Imperial Giant Larkspur planted behind the juniper shrub. (Note: I am very doubtful this shrub is going to make it. Is the growth (if it is indeed growth) green or grey? It is so hard to tell. It looks so tatty at the moment and though I am a very patient gardener, I am not sure about whether I will keep it.

Kiss Me Over the Garden Gate from Seed Savers planted in large pot near shed

Red Flax (Linum Rubrum) from Native Seed Company (I believe this went in the large pot near shed)

Wave Petunia Mix planted in two small stone planters and also in leaf shaped bird bath. UPDATE 19 May – I converted the bird bath to what it was made for and dumped the dirt with seeds, etc., in retaining wall bed.

PLANTS

Found tag for blackberry planted under the large aspen and now I have its name — It is called Triple Crown Blackberry. This plant has been slow to break dormancy.

Chihuly Rose

Chihuly Rose

I retrieved the roses I purchased from Holly Acres. I opted to plant them in front of the large planted area that contains the large aspen tree. I already had the hole for one dug so I placed the rose into its new home. Here is the information on the tag:

(cv. WEKscemala) Chihuly Rose (Floribunda)

In naming a rose to honor America’s famous glass artist, Dale Chihuly, it had to have impeccable style and an ever-changing array of flashy colors. This rose has it all! As the sun hits the opening petals, they blush from subtly-striped apricot yellow to dazzling orange and deep red . . . . producing a remarkable display against the deep dark green leaves and mahogany-red new growth.

Height/Habit: Medium/Bushy
Bloom/Size: Medium-large, double
Petal Count: 25 to 30
Fragrance: Mild tea
Parentage: Scentimental and Amalia
Comments: Larger flowers in cool conditions

I purchased another trumped creeper to mirror the other planted on the right side of the patio. I dug its hole today. Here is the information from the tag:

Campsis x tagliabuana ‘Madame Galen’
All summer flowering
Large, fast growing, clinging vine with stems to 15 to 30 feet

Tuesday, 14 May:
Planted some desert sunflower seeds near the Chihuly rose

Thursday, 16 May
Planted old Marigold seeds among the clover under aspen
With the ground wet from fresh rain, I created the other hole for my second rose. Note, when removing from pot, the root ball collapsed. This rose is definitely struggling a bit and the broken root ball is not going to help things. Here is the information from the tag:

strike_it_rich

Strike It Rich
(cv. WEKbepmey) Deep golden yellow spun with orange-pink. Grandiflora
You are in the money . . . If you love spicy fragrance, loads of bloom and super-long elegant buds of gold polished with rosy pink. The long-lasting sparkling yellow-orange tones are rich and opulent enough to bring out the gold digger in any gardener. But id does not take a stash of expensive chemicals to keep this good lookin’ girl happy in the landscape. The natural disease resistance and strong vigor do the deed. Very dark green leaves and unusual red stems set off the many showy clusters of blossoms. Hit pay dirt with Strike It Rich!

Height/Habit: Medium-tall/upright and bushy
Bloom/Size: Large, double, informal
Petal Count: About 30
Fragrance: Strong sweet spice and fruit
Parentage: ChRiscinn x Mellow Yellow
Comments: ‘Scent-sational’ for a bouquet and ‘beauty-full’ in the landscape.

Hollyhock – Outhouse (Latin: Alcea rosea)
Planted these seeds behind where I buried my little clump of Vinca Major. I purchased these from eBay from Heirlooms R Us Seeds

Eryngium Mixed
I threw some of these into the terra cotta pots where I planted some alyssum. These were planted toward the back while blue fax was planted toward the center. I also threw some seeds near the log. These seeds were purchased from Plant World Seeds

Mint from Russia. Planed in the crevices near the juniper

Upland Watercress
Latin: Nasturtium officinale
Purchased these also from Herilooms R Us. I cannot remember where I put these. I think in the main bed with the clover. It will be interesting to see where it pops up.

Friday, 17 May

members_only.fw

This morning I was up bright and early to head downtown to take advantage of the member’s only morning at the gardens. I will create a blog entry dedicated to this but I mention it now to highlight the plants I purchased:

Two Vining Snapdragons
Cranesbill geranium
Salvia ‘Christine Yeo’
I also purchased several seeds which I hope to plant soon

Corsican Violet

Corsican Violet

After the botanical gardens, I made a trip to Holly Acres and bought some plants to fill in some gaps:
Garlic bulbs
Onions
Two perennial chives
Lantana
Hanging basket filled with an array of petunias, verbena and so much more!
Marigolds
Corsican violet
Snap dragons

Today’s Discoveries:
The carrot sprouts are emerging so I am very happy the weather will be turning cooler. Other items of note: two days ago, I noticed poppy sprouts and four days ago sweet pea sprouts! Also two days ago, I had one lone daffodil bloom emerge.

Saturday, 19 May

hollyhock_seeds.fw

Hollyhock Bloom from My Gardening Past

Hollyhock Bloom from My Gardening Past

I have a vining plant of some description in the big pot located in the corner of the Adirondack chair seating area. I am thinking perhaps it gets too much sun. It probably is not but still, this prompted me to plant hollyhock seeds around it in hopes of shaded cover. Not stopping there, I planted some around the Viola Odorata as well. One can never have too many hollyhocks planted. I believe I planted more but cannot recall where. I will find out soon enough though.

Today’s Discoveries:
Curious if the bee balm located in the half whisky barrel where the chamomile is dominating is coming back to life, I moved some leaves where it should be growing and in that area are leaves coming up which look like they could indeed be bee balm. When there are more, I will rub them in the hope I reveal that distinct aroma.

The marjoram sprouts are emerging.

African Daisies

African Daisies

The snap dragons are now nestled among the marigolds under the thistle seed feeder. Speaking of which, I am blessed to have gold finches visiting said thistle feeder. I also planted the new marigolds. As mentioned earlier, I decided to move the leaf shaped bird bath to the top area and use it as such as opposed to a planter. I also moved one of the clay gnomes and the before mentioned marigolds were planted at the foot of the gnome.

I rummaged through some boxes and found soil improver along with a lot of old seeds. I spread the optimizer and in a care free fashion, I broadcasted dill, alfalfa, desert bluebells and African daisies in the planted area where the struggling juniper is. This in addition to the copious amount of clover I broadcasted a couple days ago.

I think it is important to include the notes on the dill I planted. The seeds were purchased The Seed Savers Exchange and the name of this variety is Grandma Einck’s Dill. Here is the description on the back:

Grandma Einck’s Dill
Anetyhum gravolens

Description: Iowa heirloom grown near Festina, Iowa since 1920 by the Einck family (Diane Whealy’s grandmother). Large fragrant heads are great for making dill pickles, spicing up summer salads or as a unique addition to flower bouquets. Foliage is abundant and long lasting. Being permanently maintained at Heritage Farm for its beauty, fragrance and warm memories. Self-Seeding annual.

Despite previous intentions, not only am I leaving the ‘petunia pot’ on the ledge of the planted area under the large aspen but I also added more pots. Filled with compost, I planted all my rock cress seeds (Aubrieta Deltoidea) in these pots along with some bulbs I believe are rain lily bulbs.

This reminds me . . . Yesterday I planted several onion bulbs along with some garlic in the planted area beneath the large aspen. I have a fear of rabbits infiltrating my garden and demolishing my clover patches I am currently enjoying very much. This is one tactic I will begin with to hopefully repel them. Note, I must take care of all the gaps under the fences to prevent them from getting in at all.

22 May

Seedlings are emerging from the large pot near the shed. The best part is, I do not know what the seedlings are as it is part of the mix o’ seeds I placed in the middle of the pot. I am anxiously awaiting the Kiss Me Over the Garden Gate Seeds to sprout.

The clover sprouts are emerging in the bed where the struggling juniper is.

Planted some dandelions in the tomato earth boxes and pumpkin seeds in small pots in the greenhouse.

Each day brings something new to behold. Spring has arrived in all its spectacular, miraculous glory. Each moment I am outside communing with my garden I am studying everything looking for new life and I am always filled with joy and amazement at what I see. Until next time, I wish you all the very best and pray your days are blessed.

I leave you now with some images related to all I have written about. 🙂

Fresh aspen leaves after the rain

Fresh aspen leaves after the rain

Close up of chive flower

Close up of chive flower

Clover Patch

Clover Patch

Carrot Seedlings

Carrot Seedlings

More new aspen leaves after rain

More new aspen leaves after rain

Blueberries in Bloom

Blueberries in Bloom

Purslane Seedlings

Purslane Seedlings

Salvia 'Christine Yeo' hybrid

Salvia ‘Christine Yeo’ hybrid

Virginia Creeper Close Up

Virginia Creeper Close Up

Planted Area With Pots

Planted Area With Pots

Chives

Chives

Marigolds and Snap Dragon Planted Area

Marigolds and Snap Dragon Planted Area

Large Pot With Vine as Showcase

Large Pot With Vine as Showcase

Lantana Pot

Lantana Pot

Whisky Half Barrel with Chamomile

Whisky Half Barrel with Chamomile

New Leaf of Virginia Creeper

New Leaf of Virginia Creeper

Lantana Blossom

Lantana Blossom

Sweet Pea Seedling

Sweet Pea Seedling

Alyssum

Alyssum

Tulipa 'Ad Rem'

Tulipa ‘Ad Rem’

Bee Balm Emerging

Bee Balm Emerging

Yellow Petunia

Yellow Petunia

Yellow Daisy

Yellow Daisy

Apple Blossom

Apple Blossom

Eupatorium Chocolate

Eupatorium Chocolate